Modeling the Ministry Success of Jesus

Why do we expect to be welcomed and cheered in our communities?

Another time Jesus went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there. Some of them were looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath. Jesus said to the man with the shriveled hand, “Stand up in front of everyone.” Then Jesus asked them, “Which is lawful on the Sabbath: to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?” But they remained silent. He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored. Then the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus. (Mark 3:1-6)

How do you measure your ministry success? Do you measure it by the number of seats that are filled in your auditorium on Sunday morning? Do you measure it by the number of likes and follows you boast on social media? Do you measure it by the number of people who wear a t-shirt branded with your logo?

As strange as it seems, there is a culture of ‘success’ permeating the sacred walls of ministry. At what point did we buy into the lie that successful ministry is calculated by how ‘liked’ we are by the masses?

As the idea of relative truth continues to mold and dictate our culture, our society is quickly becoming known for their, “what is good for you, is good for you” mentality.

Will followers of Christ succumb to this ‘safe’ belief and, in so doing, reject the life of persecution and judgement Jesus actually experienced while on this earth?

I recently found myself struck by a glaring truth.

Jesus loved the least of these, healed the sick, cared …

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from Simon Cox Blog http://feeds.christianitytoday.com/~r/christianitytoday/ctmag/~3/RRFx1y6TWVU/modeling-ministry-success-of-jesus.html

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